Form here on I will be blogging on my new website. Halflightbindery.com
I will keep this tumblr up so I can internet lurk all of you but new posts will be at the above new shiny website.

The sooner I get through the silliness, the better. Books to follow.

The sooner I get through the silliness, the better. Books to follow.

It’s time to say goodbye to my bench at North Bennet. 
So long pal. You never accepted anything but the very best I could muster. You kept me honest and more than once you put me in my place. We worked out a lot of shit together, and most of the lessons were learned the hard way. But if it had been easy it wouldn’t have been any fun.

It’s time to say goodbye to my bench at North Bennet. 

So long pal. You never accepted anything but the very best I could muster. You kept me honest and more than once you put me in my place. We worked out a lot of shit together, and most of the lessons were learned the hard way. But if it had been easy it wouldn’t have been any fun.

School is almost over. Just one more week which will mostly consist of packing, cleaning and the customary bench signing and table hockey tournament. It’s sad to go, but I’m so excited to get out there in the real world. I’m sure I will have more to say on the matter as the week goes on but for now here are some photos of the bindery. 

risilovesink:

Our instructor got back from his two-week teaching stint at the Paper and Book Intensive today, and enthused about the Bookbinder Barbie he won at the auction there. Apparently she comes back up in the PBI auction every few years, but with more bookbinding accessories. Jeff said her paring knife sucks and she will need a new one. Since we have finished all our projects and have nothing better to do than play with dolls, Kevin set to making a tiny paring knife, and I was tasked with making a sheath for it. It’s pretty nice. Cuts well.

Maybe we went too far. But just in case Jeff Peachey is listening we made sure to use a fully hardened bit of hacksaw blade. I measured today, as best I could, to confirm that it is in fact 13 degrees and it does pare leather reasonably well. 

I spent most of today finishing up a small set of these four flap portfolios for the Vista Sans Wood Type project.  My classmate and I have been slowly making about 8 of these, for their kickstarter campaign, over the course of the last year. They are actually really fun to work on because they are so much bigger than our usual scale. It’s fun to have to work out new problems and be innovative. The cloth is Canapetta and the label is made from cherry wood paper and carbon stamped. 

Check out my first complete fine binding.

Full black goat skin, with hand-dyed goat skin craquele onlays made by the binder (ME!). With palladium tooling.

I had the opportunity over the last few months to work with a really great photographer to produce this book of his work. I am really excited about the product.

Photos and layout by John Chervinsky 

http://www.chervinsky.org/

Here’s a preview of what I will be working on when I get back to my bench

Here’s a preview of what I will be working on when I get back to my bench

Man, it feels so good to keep updating this bad boy.

Here is a model we made of a very common 18th-century binding with a Cambridge Panel design. I don’t have any images of the process but this was a very interesting binding to make. These binding were made en masse during the 1700s. Our instructor says this was the last gasp of hand binding in any quantity.

We tried to stay true to contemporary techniques and speed. This meant that we didn’t do much layout for the tooling or titling; instead we worked quickly and by eye. All the historical examples we looked at were done very quickly and the tooling was obviously not perfect but was still nice. I found the process so fascinating because  my approach is usually so calculated and measured, but it was fun to put my ruler away and trust my eyes.

This is my very first ever full leather binding! The leather is calf that we dyed and sprinkled.  We used a spoke shave to pare the leather, which turned out to be a disaster because a little monster lives inside my spokeshave and he likes to eat leather for lunch.  Asshole. For more info on the spokeshave, cruise around this blog. I have since made peace with the little monster and now the spokeshave works fine.